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Patient Counselling - Medicines and Devices

X-PIL
Patient Information Leaflets Online

X-PIL ensures that patient information leaflets (PILs) supplied with medicines are accessible to everyone, including those with sight problems.

X-PIL is a leading source of reliable and up-to-date information on UK medicines. All the PILs on the web site are supplied and updated regularly by UK pharmaceutical companies.

Source: xpil.medicines.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflets
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 28/09/15 Link Error: Report It

 

electronic Medicines Compendium
Patient Information Leaflets

Up to date, approved and regulated prescribing information for licensed medicines – Summaries of Product Characteristics (SPCs) and Patient Information Leaflets (PILs)

Source: medicines.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflets
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Last Checked: 28/09/15 Link Error: Report It

 

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Guidance written for patients and the public

We produce versions of all our guidance for patients, carers and members of the public. Click on the 'information for the public' tab on the guidance pages

Source: nice.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Guidance
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Last Checked: 13/11/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Patient Booklets

Patient versions of guidelines are booklets that ‘translate’ guideline recommendations and their rationales originally produced for health professionals into a form that is more easily understood and used by patients and the public.

By writing information from guidelines in an accessible format, we are empowering people to take part in decisions about their treatment and care.

Source: sign.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Booklets
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Last Checked: 27/09/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Taking medicines - some questions & answers about side effects

Most people take medicines without suffering any side effects. But some people react badly, so read on

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
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Last Checked: 23/02/15 Link Error: Report It

 

I’ve missed a dose; what should I do?

More than 80% of patients occasionally miss a dose of their medication. Health practitioners ought to plan with their patients what to do if a dose is missed. Patients believe that this plan should be a required part of the information received when a medication is prescribed and dispensed.

Source: nps.org.au
Pharmacy Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 08/08/16 Link Error: Report It

 

What should people do if they miss a dose of their medicine?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

It is very difficult to give general guidance on what to do in these situations. Each case needs to be looked at individually. However, this Medicines Q&A offers some general guidance, which may help people who occasionally forget or delay a dose.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Why must some medicines be taken when the stomach is empty?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

It is possible to find out whether a medicine needs to be taken when the stomach is empty by checking the electronic Medicines Compendium (eMC) for the manufacturer’s patient information leaflet (PIL) or summary of product characteristics (SPC).

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Why must some medicines be taken with or just after food, or a meal?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

It is possible to find out whether a medicine needs to be taken with or just after food, or a meal by checking the electronic Medicines Compendium (eMC) for the manufacturer’s patient information leaflet (PIL) or summary of product characteristics (SPC).

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Medicines for Children

Medicines information leaflets cover many of the medicines that are prescribed or recommended to children by a pharmacist, doctor or nurse. They answer your questions about how and when to give the medicine, what to do if you forget to give the medicine or give it twice, and any possible side-effects.

Medicines for Children is a partnership programme by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH), Neonatal and Paediatric Pharmacists Group (NPPG), and WellChild.

Source: medicinesforchildren.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Medicines Information Leaflets
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Important information to know when you take any of the following drugs:

Amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone)
Buspirone (Buspar)
Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
Cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral)
Nifedipine (Procardia, Aldalat)
Simvastatin (Zocor)
Sirolimus (Rapamune)
Tacrolimus (Prograf)

Grapefruit can interact with the drugs listed above.

When taking any of these drugs, avoid:

  • Grapefruit juice
  • Fresh, canned, or frozen grapefruit
  • Drinks that contain grapefruit juice
Source: cc.nih.gov
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Publication
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

How to Administer

  • How to Use Ear Drops Properly
  • How to Use Eye Drops Properly
  • How to Use Eye Ointments and Gels Properly
  • How to Use Metered-Dose Inhalers
  • How to Use Nose Drops Properly
  • How to Use Nasal Sprays Properly
  • How to Use Rectal Suppositories Properly
  • How to Use Transdermal Patches
  • How to Use Vaginal Tablets, Suppositories, and Creams
Source: safemedication.com
Pharmacy Resource: Illustrations
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Inserting Suppositories

Inserting Rectal Suppositories
Inserting Vaginal Suppositories

Source: pharmlabs.unc.edu
Pharmacy Resource: Instructions
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Using your inhaler

For more information on how to use different kinds of inhalers, please see our video selection below:

  • Metered Dose Inhaler
  • Autohaler
  • Accuhaler
  • Peak Flow Meter
  • EasiBreathe Inhaler
  • Easyhaler
  • Turbohaler
  • Small Volume Spacer
  • Small Volume Spacer (with child)
  • Large Volume Spacer (single breath)
  • Large Volume Spacer (multi-breath)
  • Large Volume Spacer (with a mask)
  • Large Volume Spacer (with a child)
Source: asthma.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Videos
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Instructions for Inhaler and Spacer Use

The diagrams and instructions presented here illustrate the use of various currently available inhaler devices. These instructions can be viewed, printed, and downloaded for use in patient education.

Source: ginasthma.org
Pharmacy Resource: Instructions
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Inhaler and Spacer Patient Information Leaflets

The inhaler leaflets are suitable for patients who use an inhaler, or for use by carers of patients in supporting the patient with their inhaler device. The leaflets give information regarding correct inhaler technique and care for the device.

Download the leaflets

Using Inhalers - Accuhaler™
Using Inhalers - AeroChamber Plus™ Spacer
Using Inhalers - Autohaler®
Using Inhalers - Easi-Breathe®
Using Inhalers - Easyhaler®
Using Inhalers - HandiHaler®
Using Inhalers - Metered Dose Inhaler (MDI) with a Spacer
Using Inhalers - Turbohaler®
Using Inhalers - Volumatic™ Spacer

Source: webarchive.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflets
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Last Checked: 23/10/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Inhalers for Asthma

There are many different types of inhaler, which can be confusing. This leaflet gives information on: the drugs (medicines) that are inside inhalers, the various types of inhaler device, and some general information about inhalers. This leaflet is about inhalers for asthma.

Source: patient.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Global Initiative for Asthma Patient Guide: You Can Control Your Asthma

An information guide for patients and their families. Reflects the focus on achieving asthma control in the current GINA guideline documents.

Source: ginasthma.org
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Asthma & Inhaled Steroids

Inflamed bronchial tubes are an important part of the problem in asthma. The cause of the inflammation is not always known, although for many persons a persistent, low-grade allergic reaction is probably the culprit.

Source: asthma.partners.org
Pharmacy Resource: Brochure
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Spacer Devices

An introduction to spacers for health care professionals: how, when, and why these devices should be used. Prepared by Soren Pedersen, GINA Executive Committee.

Source: ginasthma.org
Pharmacy Resource: Document
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Peak Flow Meter: Tips to Remember

The readings on a peak flow meter tell you how open your airways are, so you can better manage your asthma.

Source: aaaai.org
Pharmacy Resource: Tips
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Nebuliser

A nebuliser is a device that helps you take your medication. It changes liquid medicine into a fine mist. You then breathe in the mist through a mouthpiece or a mask.

Source: blf.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 20/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Oxygen Therapy

If you’re living with a lung condition, you may be offered oxygen therapy if your blood oxygen levels are low to reduce feelings of breathlessness and tiredness.

Source: blf.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 20/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Living With COPD

This booklet aims to help you understand what COPD is and describes coping mechanisms to help you get the most out of life. You may have to read it several times or dip in and out of the different sections as you need the information.

Source: chss.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 04/11/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Patient Information About Treatments For Asthma And Allergic Rhinitis, Prescriptions & Over the Counter Medicine

This Leaflet has been designed to help people understand the medication they may have been given if they have asthma and allergic rhinitis.

Source: allergyuk.org
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 18/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Allergy Medications

The treatments prescribed for allergy control the symptoms and reactions; they do not cure the condition. However, using treatments as prescribed can show a huge change in a patient’s health, mood and development once the medication or treatment routine is working to control the symptoms.

Source: allergyuk.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 18/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

On the correct use of eye drops

Patients should be instructed on how to use their eye drops. They need to know about the frequency and the method of administration, and how the drops should be stored.

Source: nps.org.au
Pharmacy Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 08/08/16 Link Error: Report It

 

How to Use Eye Drops

This leaflet gives general advice on how to use most eye drops.

Source: patient.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Eye drops and how to use them

Source: northdevonhealth.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

How to Use Unit Dose Eye Drops

Source: moorfieldspharmaceuticals.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Poster
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

How to use an eye ointment

Source: chealth.canoe.ca
Pharmacy Resource: Instructions
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Chloramphenicol for eye infections

Chloramphenicol eye drops and ointment are used to treat bacterial eye infections. Eye infections are a common cause of conjunctivitis.

Source: patient.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society Guide: Chloramphenicol Eye Drops and Eye Ointment

Since reclassification from prescription only medicine status, chloramphenicol eye drops/ointment has been available over the counter from pharmacies as a treatment for acute bacterial conjunctivitis in adults, the elderly and children aged two years or over. Pharmacists need to be satisfied when making a supply of chloramphenicol P medicine that it is in line with its marketing authorisation and is clinically beneficial, given that acute bacterial conjunctivitis can be self-limiting and does not always require antibacterial therapy.

Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to members of the RPS

Last Checked: 03/04/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Understanding Dry Eye

Dry eye is an eye condition caused by a problem with tears. Dry eye can make your eye feel dry, scratchy, irritated and uncomfortable. It often affects both eyes but sometimes one eye is affected more than the other.

Source: rcophth.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 18/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Understanding Glaucoma

Glaucoma is the name for a group of eye conditions in which the optic nerve is damaged at the point at which it leaves the eye. This nerve carries information from the light sensitive layer in your eye, the retina, to the brain where it is received as a picture.

Source: rcophth.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 18/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Steroid Nasal Sprays

How to use a steroid nasal spray

Source: patient.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Administrating Insulin and Insulin Analogues

Topics in This Section

Insulin - an overview • Starting on insulin • Using a Syringe • How to mix insulin in a syringe • How to Inject Insulin • How to adjust your Dose of Insulin • Insulin Needles • Dealing with Needle Phobia • Insulin Pen Devices available in the UK• Innovo Insulin Injection Device • Needle Free Insulin • Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes • Insulin Pump Therapy • Inhaled Insulin • Oral Insulin • Insulin for the Elderly Patient • New Insulins - Introduction • Insulin Lyspro • Insulin Glargine (Lantus) • Insulin Detemir • Insulin Exubera • Insulin Glulisine (Aprida)

Source: diabetesuffolk.com
Pharmacy Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

The Tayside Diabetes Handbook - Treatment With Insulin

Aim of Insulin Treatment
Optimum Outcome of Insulin Treatment
Principles of Insulin Treatment
Insulin Therapy in Type 1 Diabetes
Insulin Therapy in Pancreatic Pathology
Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes
Combination Therapy
Insulin in the Elderly
Starting Insulin
Insulin Preparations
Onset and Duration of Insulin
Insulin Administration Devices
Disposal of Sharps
Insulin Regimens and Dose Adjustment

Source: taysidedn.dundee.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Handbook
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Insulins

Name Manufacturer Source Delivery system Taken Onset, peak and duration (approximate hours)

Source: diabetes.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Wallchart
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Insulin Pumps

Pump Size Weight Screen Colours Basal increment Total basals Basal profiles Memory Battery life Guarantee Waterproof? Manufacturer’s description

Source: diabetes.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Wallchart
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Non-insulin treatments for Type 2 diabetes

Generic name Trade name Dosage size/strength Min–max daily dose When taken Times per day Possible side effects (most common listed first)

Source: diabetes.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Wallchart
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Insulin Pens

Manufacturer Name Dosage (min-max) Insulin used in pen Pen needles used Appearance Colour Material Cartridge or prefilled Redial dose? Carrying case

Source: diabetes.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Wallchart
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Blood Glucose Meters

Manufacturer Meter Strip / test cassette required Sample volume Time for test Blood glucose range Calibration Battery life Number of tests stored with date and time Length x width x depth Software and connection cable

Source: diabetes.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Wallchart
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Insulin patient information booklet

Read this booklet and the Insulin Passport alongside all the other information about diabetes that your diabetes nurse or doctor has given to you.

Source: npsa.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Diabetes UK – How to test blood glucose levels

Watch our video on how to test your blood glucose levels

Source: diabetes.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Video
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Hypothyroidism – clinical features and treatment

A statement by the British Thyroid Association on the clinical features (symptoms) and treatment of hypothyroidism.

Source: btf-thyroid.org
Pharmacy Resource: Statement
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland produces too little thyroxine for the body’s needs. It is also known as an underactive thyroid.

Source: btf-thyroid.org
Pharmacy Resource: Quick Guide
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Hyperthyroidism – clinical features and treatment

A statement by the British Thyroid Association on the clinical features (symptoms) and treatment of hyperthyroidism.

Source: btf-thyroid.org
Pharmacy Resource: Statement
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland produces too much thyroxine for the bodyʼs needs.

Source: btf-thyroid.org
Pharmacy Resource: Quick Guide
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Anti-thyroid drug therapy to treat hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is a condition where the thyroid produces more thyroxine than is needed by the body. It is also known as an over-active thyroid or thyrotoxicosis.

Source: btf-thyroid.org
Pharmacy Resource: Quick Guide
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Carbimazole

Important: carbimazole can cause a rare but serious side-effect which reduces the numbers of blood cells which fight infection and help to stop bleeding. If you develop any of the following, let your doctor know straightaway

Source: patient.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Carbimazole / Propythiouracil (PTU) warning

You have been started on carbimazole treatment for an overactive thyroid.

Source: bsuh.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Addison's disease Owner's Manual

The 24-page Addison's disease owners manual provides a guide for Addisonians about the practicalities of managing their health day-to-day.

Source: addisons.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Manual
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Addison's Disease - Emergency injections

How to give an emergency injection

  • Efcortesol® injection illustrated instructions
  • Solu-Cortef® injection illustrated instructions
Source: addisons.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Instructions
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Medicines for your heart

This booklet describes some of the different medicines prescribed for people with a heart condition – such as angina, heart attack, heart failure, heart rhythm disorders and heart valve disease. It also covers medicines used to control high blood pressure or to lower cholesterol levels, and those used to prevent blood clots from forming. The booklet explains why you may have been given each medicine, and how it works. It also describes the most common side effects.

Source: bhf.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 08/12/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Medicines used for Stroke

In this section we hope to answer most of the common questions about medicines and help you to understand why people who have had a stroke need to take them, how they work and list the most common side effects. 

Medicines used for Stroke

  • Anti-platelets
  • Warfarin
  • Ace Inhibitors
  • Beta-blockers
  • Diuretics
  • Calcium Channel Blockers
  • Cholesterol Lowering Drugs
Source: nhsggc.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Answers to Questions
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Cambridge University Hospitals | Patient information leaflets

Title of leaflet

• ACE-Inhibitors • Amiloride • Amiodarone • Amlodipine (Istin) • Angiotensin II antagonists • Aspirin • Beta-Blockers after a heart attack • Beta-Blockers for angina • Beta-Blockers for heart failure • Beta-Blockers for high blood pressure • Cholesterol Lowering Medicines (Statins) • Clopidogrel • Co-amilofruse • Digoxin • Diltiazem • Dipyridamole • Glyceryl Trinitrate (GTN) • Isosorbide Mononitrate • Loop Diuretics (Water Tablets) • Metolazone • Nicorandil • Nifedipine • Sotalol • Spironolactone • Thiazide Diuretics (Water tablets) • Verapamil • Warfarin

Source: cuh.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflets
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Last Checked: 12/02/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug Treatment for Heart Rhythm Disorders (Arrhythmia)

Contents

Glossary of terms
What do the drugs do?
What can I expect?
Can I take an antiarrhythmic drug if I get pregnant/ wish to breast feed?
What about any other medication?
What should I do if I feel really ill with my tablets?
How long will I take these tablets?
What happens if the tablets do not work?

Source: heartrhythmcharity.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Information Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Living with Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) happens when the electrical control of your heartbeat becomes disrupted. Normally your heartbeat is controlled by electrical signals from its own natural pacemaker, called the sino-atrial node. These signals cause the upper chambers of your heart (the atria) to squeeze blood into the lower chambers (the ventricles) which then squeeze blood out into your blood vessels.

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Digoxin

This factsheet is intended to help those affected by atrial fibrillation understand the medication digoxin, with a brief introduction to how it works, dosing and side effects.

Source: atrialfibrillation.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Amiodarone Advice

This factsheet is intended to help those affected by atrial fibrillation understand the medication amiodarone, with a brief introduction to how it works, dosing and side effects.

Source: atrialfibrillation.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

About your medicine - Clopidogrel

Clopidogrel (also known as Plavix) is an antiplatelet. It is used to reduce the risk of stroke or heart attack. It works by preventing excessive blood clotting, by helping to keep your blood platelets from sticking together.

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: Article
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Blood-thinning medication after stroke

This factsheet explains the link between blood clots and stroke and the types of blood-thinning medication that you may be prescribed to help reduce your risk of having another ischaemic stroke or TIA.

Source: stroke.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Oral Anticoagulant Therapy
Important information for patients

The booklet provides you with important information about your treatment and contact information for you to obtain further advice.

Source: npsa.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Living With Warfarin

Warfarin stops your blood from clotting within your blood vessels. It is also used to stop existing clots getting bigger as in deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and to stop parts of a clot breaking off and forming emboli as in pulmonary embolism (PE).

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Warfarin and Other Medication

This fact sheet is intended to help those affected by atrial fibrillation (AF) understand warfarin and the effects other medications may have on the effciency of this therapy.

Source: atrialfibrillation.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Warfarin

Warfarin is a medicine called an anticoagulant. Warfarin interferes with your blood clotting process in order to prevent blood clots from forming.

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: Frequently Asked Questions
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Important information to know when you are taking: Warfarin (Coumadin) and Vitamin K

The food you eat can affect how your medicine works. It is important to learn about possible drug­nutrient interactions for any medicines you take. This handout provides you with information about the interaction between warfarin (Coumadin) and vitamin K.

Source: cc.nih.gov
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Publication
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Common foods and their vitamin K content

Vitamin K in your food a few examples. Please note that you should eat a healthy diet containing dark green vegetables and salads. Research has shown that having regular small amounts of vitamin K in your diet can help to keep your INR stable. Be consistent with the amounts you eat.

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: List
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Warfarin and Diet

This factsheet is intended to help those affected by atrial fibrillation understand more about the interaction between warfarin and certain types of food, to help patients maintain a stable INR level.

Source: atrialfibrillation.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Warfarin Interactions

This guide is intended as a quick reference to highlight significant interactions between warfarin and commonly prescribed medicines or complimentary medicines and a list of the vitamin K content of some foods.

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Sorting the Myths from the Facts about the new oral anticoagulants

There is a great disparity in how and where patients have access to these new drugs, and they are telling us a variety of reasons that they are being given for not being prescribed the new oral anticoagulants.

So lets dispel some of these MYTHS and get down to some real FACTS.

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Stockings to reduce your risk of developing a clot

Patient Information Leaflet; Anti-embolism Stockings.

Source: anticoagulationeurope.org
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Reducing Your Blood Cholesterol

This booklet is for people with a high blood cholesterol level. It also gives advice to their friends and family. It explains what cholesterol is, its role in coronary heart disease, what causes a high blood cholesterol, and how it can be kept under control. It also explains which medicines are used to treat high blood cholesterol levels.

Source: bhf.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 08/12/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Statins

Cholesterol is made mainly in the liver by a multi-step process. Statins work by blocking a key liver enzyme involved in this process, thereby slowing down the production of cholesterol in the liver. This encourages the liver to take extra cholesterol, LDL cholesterol in particular, out of the blood, lowering the levels of LDL cholesterol present in the blood.

Source: heartuk.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Resins

Bile acid binding resins, also known as bile acid sequestrants or simply as ‘resins’, are one of the groups of medicines used to lower cholesterol. They have been in existence for over thirty years and are unique in that they are not absorbed into the body.

Source: heartuk.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Blood Pressure Measurement
Recommendations of the British Hypertension Society

This Website is the result of a collaborative project between the British Hypertension Society and the British Medical Journal. It was designed and constructed by the Faculty of Medicine & Medical Sciences Medi-CAL Unit at the University of Aberdeen. Its content was prepared by clinical experts at the University of Aberdeen and the Blood Pressure Unit of Beaumont Hospital, Dublin and members of the BHS Working Party Group.

Source: abdn.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Blood Pressure Monitors Validated for Home Use

The table below give a comprehensive list of all the Validated Blood Pressure monitors that are suitable for use at home and may also be used in the clinic.

Only the devices showing the BHS logo in the right hand column have been tested by the BHS Validation Service. All other devices have been tested independently.

Source: bhsoc.org
Pharmacy Resource: Table
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Angina

This booklet is for people with angina, and for their friends and family. It explains what angina is, what causes it, how angina is diagnosed, and what can be done to treat the condition. It also explains what to do if you get an episode of angina, or if you think you may be having a heart attack.

Source: bhf.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 08/12/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Medication Leaflets

SSRI antidepressants | Clozapine | Lithium | Quetiapine | Risperidone | Sulpride | Mirtazapine | Olanzapine | Carbamazepine | Amisulpride | Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors | Aripiprazole - Abilify | Lamotrigine | Maoi antidepressants | Valporate | Tricyclic antidepressants | Zuclopenthixol | Venlafaxine | Risperidone lli consta | Reboxetine | Propranolol | Pipotiazine palmitate injection | Mocobemide | Methylphenidate | Hypnotics | Haloperidol | Fluphenazine | Flupentixol decanoate inj | Discontinuing antidepressants | Benzodiazepines | Atomoxetine | Antipsychotics | Anticholinergics

Source: beh-mht.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflets
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Antipsychotics

This factsheet covers -

  1. What do antipsychotics do?
  2. How do antipsychotics work?
  3. What different types of antipsychotics are there, and what are the possible side effects?
  4. Comparative side effects table
  5. What about stopping antipsychotics?
  6. How will my antipsychotic affect other medications?
  7. Will drinking affect my medication?
  8. Can I drive when taking antipsychotics?
  9. What about sex, pregnancy and antipsychotics?
Source: rethink.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Antipsychotic medication

It includes:

  • What are antipsychotic medications?
  • How are they supposed to help?
  • How do they work?
  • What kinds of antipsychotic medication are there?
  • What are the possible side-effects?
  • How long should it be taken for?
  • How do I stop taking it?
  • What alternatives are there?
Source: rcpsych.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Depot Medication

It is a medication that is used for some types of mental distress or disorder, where you may hear voices, have difficulty controlling your thoughts or feel very agitated. This happens most often in manic depression and schizophrenia.

Source: rcpsych.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Antidepressants

This factsheet covers –

  1. How do antidepressants work?
  2. What different types of antidepressants are there?
  3. What are the possible side effects?
  4. What about stopping antidepressants?
  5. How will my antidepressant affect other medication?
  6. Can I drink while taking antidepressants?
  7. Can I drive while taking antidepressants?
  8. What about sex, pregnancy and medication?
Source: rethink.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Antidepressants

This leaflet is for anyone who wants to know more about antidepressants. It discusses how they work, why they are prescribed, their effects and side-effects, and alternative treatments. If your questions are not answered in this leaflet, there are some references and sources of further information at the end of this leaflet.

Source: rcpsych.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor (MAOI) Medications: Phenelzine (Nardil ) • Tranylcypromine (Parnate) • Isocarboxazid (Marplan) • Selegiline (Eldepryl) only in doses above 10 mg/day

There can be a dangerous interaction between your medicine and tyramine, a substance found in some foods and beverages. For this reason, you must follow these dietary instructions from the day you start taking an MAOI medicine until 3 to 4 weeks after you stop taking it.

Source: cc.nih.gov
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Publication
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Mood Stabilisers

This factsheet covers -

  1. How do mood stabilisers work?
  2. What different types of mood stabilisers are there?
  3. What are the possible side-effects?
  4. What about stopping mood stabilisers?
  5. How will my mood stabiliser affect other medication?
  6. Will drinking alcohol affect my mood stabilisers?
  7. Can I drive when taking mood stabilisers?
  8. What about sex, pregnancy and mood stabilisers?
Source: rethink.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Lithium Therapy - Important information for patients

Source: npsa.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Important information to know when you are take: Lithium

These diet guidelines will help you keep your lithium blood level stable

Source: cc.nih.gov
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Publication
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Crohn's and Colitis UK

Drug Treatment Information:

Source: crohnsandcolitis.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Information Leaflets
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Drugs used in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

This booklet aims to answer some of the questions most often asked about IBD drugs and medicines.

Source: crohnsandcolitis.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Disease Modifying Drugs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD):

The following leaflets are designed to provide information for patients with IBD regarding the use of disease modifying drugs, their indications, side effects and guidelines for safe monitoring.

Source: bsg.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflets
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Questions and answers for women who use hormonal contraceptives

Hpv Infection and Cervical Cancer

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Question and Answer Document
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Last Checked: 23/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

MHRA UK Public Assessment Report - Combined oral contraceptives (the Pill): when to start taking the Pill, and missed pill advice

The review examined evidence from several sources, including WHO and the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. On the basis of the evidence and CHM advice, the MHRA recommends the following advice on when to start taking COCs (referred to as ‘the Pill’ in the text), and what actions to take when the Pill is missed, for COCs marketed in the UK.

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Report
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Last Checked: 23/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Your guide to the combined pill

The combined pill is usually just called the pill. It contains two hormones – estrogen and progestogen. These are similar to the natural hormones women produce in their ovaries.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Your guide to the progestogen-only pill

This pill contains a progestogen hormone which is similar to the natural progesterone women produce in their ovaries. Progestogen-only pills (POPs) are different to combined pills because they do not contain any estrogen.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Your guide to the contraceptive patch

The contraceptive patch is a small, thin, beige coloured patch, nearly 5cm x 5cm in size. You stick it on your skin and it releases two hormones – estrogen and progestogen.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Your guide to the contraceptive vaginal ring

The contraceptive vaginal ring is a flexible, transparent, plastic ring. It is placed in the vagina where it releases two hormones – estrogen and progestogen.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Your Guide to long-acting reversible contraception (LARC)

This leaflet provides information about four methods that do not depend on you remembering to take or use them to be effective.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Your guide to the contraceptive implant

An implant is a small flexible rod that is placed just under your skin in your upper arm. It releases a progestogen hormone similar to the natural progesterone that women produce in their ovaries and works for up to three years.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Your guide to contraceptive injections

There are two types of injection. Depo-Provera protects you from pregnancy for 12 weeks and Noristerat protects you for eight weeks. Depo-Provera is the most commonly used contraceptive injection in the UK.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Your guide to the IUD

There are different types and sizes of IUD to suit different women. An IUD can stay in for 5–10 years, depending on type.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Your guide to the IUS

An IUS is a small T-shaped plastic device that is put into your uterus (womb). It releases a progestogen hormone. This is similar to the natural progesterone that women produce in their ovaries.

Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society Guide: Oral emergency contraceptives as pharmacy medicines

Sections on this page

  • Diagram on decision-making for the supply of oral emergency contraception
  • Product characteristics
  • When to refer
  • Supply to patients representative
  • Advance supply of oral emergency contraception
  • Long term contraception and sexual health
  • Vulnerable adults and children
Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to members of the RPS

Last Checked: 03/04/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Your guide to emergency contraception

There are different types of emergency contraception:

  • the emergency contraceptive pill,
  • Levonelle the emergency contraceptive pill,
  • ellaOne the emergency intrauterine device (IUD).
Source: fpa.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

HRT: What you should know about the benefits and risks

This leaflet sets out the known facts about HRT. It summarises the results of studies regarding its safety and addresses the controversy that still surrounds it, together with current thinking about its suitability. It is free of medical jargon and written specifically for women wishing to know about HRT. It is also a helpful and balanced primer for GPs who do not specialise in menopause.

Source: womens-health-concern.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

HRT

HRTs today come in all shapes and sizes, each designed to offer as wide a choice as possible to the menopausal woman. However, there is not only choice in the type and dose of hormones available, there is also choice in how these hormones are introduced to the body – or what doctors call "the route of delivery".

Source: womens-health-concern.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Hormone Replacement Therapy

What is H.R.T?, Risks and benefits of H.R.T., Side-effects, Conclusion, Useful resources.

Source: menopausematters.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 16/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

HRT+YOU
All you need to know

In this booklet, you will find all the information you need to enable you to take control of your menopause, rather than let it control you. It will provide you with the facts about HRT and will enable you to weigh up its benefits and risks in order to decide if it is something that is right for you. That way, you can be prepared and informed about what to expect, and be ready to manage things from a position of power and knowledge.

Source: menopausematters.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

HRT+YOU
After the first three months

You started HRT a few weeks ago and may have some questions regarding your treatment.

Source: menopausematters.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Alternatives to hormone replacement therapy for symptoms of the menopause

This information is for you if you are considering alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for symptoms of the menopause. This leaflet does not discuss the risks or benefits of HRT in detail.

Source: rcog.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 18/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Mirena Coil for Heavy Periods

Questions and Answers for Patients

Source: britishfibroidtrust.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factfile
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society Guide: Tranexamic Acid

Sections on this page

  • What is tranexamic acid indicated for?
  • Who to refer to a doctor?
  • What is “heavy” menstrual bleeding?
  • How does tranexamic acid work?
  • What is the dose of tranexamic acid?
  • When should tranexamic acid not be supplied?
  • What are the side effects of tranexamic acid?
  • Are there any drug interactions with tranexamic aicd?
  • Can I supply tranexamic acid to a third party?
  • Where to go for further information
Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to member of the RPS

Last Checked: 03/04/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Managing premenstrual syndrome (PMS)

Premenstrual syndrome or PMS is the name given to a collection of physical and emotional symptoms that can occur in the two weeks before you have your period.

Source: rcog.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 18/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Prostate Cancer UK Publications

Bisphosphonates for advanced prostate cancer

This fact sheet is for men who would like to know more about bisphosphonates to relieve pain in prostate cancer that has spread to the bones.

Hormone therapy drug: degarelix

This fact sheet is for men who are about to start, or are already taking, the hormone drug degarelix to control their prostate cancer. It explains how the drug is taken, why it is used and what side effects it may cause.

Hormone therapy

This fact sheet is for men who are about to start, or are already receiving, hormone therapy to control their prostate cancer.

Living with hormone therapy: A guide for men with prostate cancer

This booklet is for men who are having hormone therapy for prostate cancer, their partners and families. It describes the different types of hormone therapy, how they work and what the treatment involves. It includes information on the possible side effects men may experience and suggests ways to help manage these.

Source: prostatecanceruk.org
Pharmacy Resource: Publications
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Viagra, Cialis Or Levitra Treatment For Erectile Dysfunction
Frequently-Asked Questions

These drugs are only licensed for use in men with erectile dysfunction (impotence). They are not recommended for men with normal erections who simply wish to improve their sexual performance.

Source: baus.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Oral treatments for impotence (erectile dysfunction)

All three treatments belong to a group of drugs called PDE5 inhibitors, which are in tablet form.

Source: sda.uk.net
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

The vacuum pump

Vacuum pumps have a long history and have been commercially available since 1985. A pump consists of a clear plastic cylinder and a pump which may be hand or battery operated.

Source: sda.uk.net
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Testosterone (and the 'andropause')

Testosterone is the male hormone which is responsible for a man’s and (partially ) a woman’s sex drive. In men it is important for a man’s well-being, as it maintains his reproductive tissues, stimulates sperm formation, stimulates and maintains his sexual drive and function, as well as increases his muscles, strengthens his bones and stimulates blood formation.

Source: sda.uk.net
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Commonly Used Drugs
British Kidney Patient Association

Source: britishkidney-pa.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Self-Help Information For Recurrent Cystitis In Women

Cystitis is an inflammation of the bladder lining. It is common for the water outlet pipe (the urethra) to be affected as well.

Source: baus.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Patient Information Leaflets (PILs)
British Association of Dermatologists

These downloadable leaflets offer an expert source of information across the spectrum of skin-related topics, including diseases, conditions, symptoms and treatments.

Source: bad.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflets
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Last Checked: 09/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Isotretinoin

Properties | Indications for treatment | Dosage | Side effects | Drug interactions | Monitoring | Pregnancy | Slow responders | Relapses

Source: dermnetnz.org
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Pharmacist’s guide to dispensing isotretinoin

This brochure provides a guide to dispensing isotretinoin in accordance with the Pregnancy Prevention Programme.

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
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Last Checked: 23/02/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Patient information brochure - isotretinoin

This brochure contains important information about your treatment with isotretinoin in relation to minimising the risks of possible birth defects with this medicine.

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Brochure
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Last Checked: 23/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Contraception and isotretinoin

This leaflet discusses the different types of contraception, how to use them and how effective they are. Any method of contraception, however effective, may fail, and by using two methods at once you will minimise the risk of pregnancy.

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Brochure
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Last Checked: 23/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Treatments for psoriatic arthritis: An overview

This leaflet has been written to help you understand the treatments that are currently available to treat psoriatic arthritis.

Source: papaa.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Treatments for psoriasis: An overview

This leaflet has been written to help you understand the treatments that are currently available to treat psoriasis.

Source: papaa.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Psoriasis Treatments

Although psoriasis is a chronic long term condition with no cure, it can be controlled and go into remission (go away). Not all people will be affected in the same way and doctors will class the condition as mild, moderate or severe. The following are the different types of treatments you may be offered.

Antifungals
Coal Tar
Combination Therapies
Dithranol
Emollients
Immunosuppressants and Biologics
Retinoids
Steroids
Vitamin D analogues

Source: papaa.org
Pharmacy Resource: Articles
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Emollients and Psoriasis

This leaflet is written to help you understand how emollients can help psoriasis, their benefits, how they work, the choice available and their routine use.

Source: papaa.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 16/06/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Scalp Psoriasis

This leaflet has been written to help you understand what scalp psoriasis is, what the symptoms are, what the treatments are and offers some useful tips for dealing with scalp psoriasis.

Source: papaa.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Pustular Psoriasis

This leaflet has been written to help you understand more about different types of pustular psoriasis, including treatments.

Source: papaa.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Emollients

An explanation of emollients and emollient products, and how to use them.

Source: eczema.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Topical Steroids

Topical steroids, their different strengths and how to use them.

Source: eczema.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors

An explanation of Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors (Pimecrolimus and Tacrolimus) and their role in the management and treatment of eczema.

Source: eczema.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Azathioprine

Azathioprine is mainly used in the UK to treat patients with severe atopic eczema that is unresponsive to normal topical treatment.

Source: eczema.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Ciclosporin

Ciclosporin works in atopic eczema by decreasing the production of inflammatory cytokines (chemical messengers that ‘switch on’ other lymphocytes and regulate immune responses).

Source: eczema.org
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Soak–Pare–Paint Regime for Warts

Source: pcds.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Formaldehyde for the treatment of plantar warts

Source: pcds.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Formaldehyde for the treatment of pitted keratolysis

Source: pcds.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflet
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Last Checked: 09/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain Practice Guide: Amorolfine Nail Lacquer

Sections on this page

  • About amorolfine
  • Dosage & directions for use
  • When to supply amorolfine nail lacquer
  • Side-effects & potential issues of amorolfine usage
  • Where to go for further information
Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to member of the RPS

Last Checked: 03/04/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Diet Changes When Taking Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)

Source: patienteducation.osumc.edu
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Education Handout
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

When can I drink alcohol after finishing metronidazole?

Source: nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Tuberculosis (TB) Treatment

Source: tbalert.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 30/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

About Your Tuberculosis (TB) Drugs

Source: tbalert.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 30/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Steroids: 10 Questions and answers for patients

  1. What are steroid medicines used for?
  2. What are the different types of steroid medicines?
  3. Are there any important side effects that I should look out for when taking steroids?
  4. Why might I need to look out for infections?
  5. What about longer term side effects?
  6. How do I report a suspected side effect?
  7. Is it safe to take other medicines when taking steroids?
  8. What do I need to know about stopping steroid tablets?
  9. Why have I been given a steroid ‘blue card’?
  10. Where can I get more information on steroids and other medicines?
Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 23/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Gwent guidance on When to Give a Steroid Card

Source: wales.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Guidance
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Part One Guidance on Steroid Treatment Cards With Inhaled Steroids
Part Two Oral Corticosteroids, Adrenal Insufficiency and Steroid Cards

Steroid treatment cards give guidance on minimising associated risks of therapy with corticosteroids and provide details of the prescriber, drug, dosage and duration of treatment.

Source: nhstayside.scot.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Guidance
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Guidance on when to issue a Steroid Treatment Card

All patients prescribed systemic corticosteroids for periods of more than three weeks should receive a steroid treatment card at the outset of treatment.

Source: telfordccg.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Guidance
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Epilepsy and treatment

Contents

Anti-epileptic medication (AED)
How do AEDs work?
Which drug is right for me?
Getting the dosage right
What about side effects?
Women and anti-epileptic medication
Emergency drug treatment
Missed doses
Stopping anti-epileptic medication
Surgery
Vagus/Vagal Nerve Stimulation (VNS)
Ketogenic diet
Complementary therapies
Lifestyle
And finally …. medical research

Source: epilepsyscotland.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

List of anti-epileptic drugs for adults

This table of anti-epileptic drugs used in adults gives guidelines only and gives average daily dose ranges.

The side effects listed in this table are some of the most common possible side effects for each AED.

Source: epilepsysociety.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: List
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Treatment of Epilepsy

All you need to know about epilepsy medications, surgery and complementary approaches

Source: epilepsy.ie
Pharmacy Resource: Publication
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Antiepileptic drugs: changing between different manufacturers’ products

The MHRA has produced a patient information sheet which summarises the key messages for patients resulting from the updated advice on the use of AEDs and outlines what this new information means for them.

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Sheet
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Last Checked: 23/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Frequently Asked Questions on Anti-Epileptic Drugs

Source: epilepsyresearch.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug treatments for Parkinson's

This booklet is for people with Parkinson's and their families. It gives information about the drugs most commonly used to help manage the condition.

It starts with some practical points about taking Parkinson's drugs and moves on to give more details about each type of drug.

There is a section that explains more about clinical trials to develop new drug treatments, and a glossary to explain the meaning of unfamiliar medical words or terms.

Source: parkinsons.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Key information for community pharmacists
Parkinson's UK

This booklet is for pharmacists and their teams working in the community and tells you about how you can help someone with Parkinson's to take control of their condition through effectively managing medication.

It includes information about the importance of medication in Parkinson's and the key ways you can support people with Parkinson’s in your everyday practice.

Source: parkinsons.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 29/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Apomorphine

This information sheet looks at the types of apomorphine available, how it is taken and the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment.

Source: parkinsons.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Information Sheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug treatments for Alzheimer's disease

This factsheet explains how the main drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease work, where to access them, and when they can be prescribed and used effectively.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 30/11/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Drugs used to relieve behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia

This factsheet looks at the different types of drugs that can be used to treat these symptoms if non-drug treatments have not worked. It explains when and how they should be prescribed and what the side-effects might be.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 30/11/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Understanding and managing pain: information for patients

This booklet has been produced to help patients understand and manage their pain. Whether the pain is recent or long-term, severe or less severe, this booklet explores how to get the best out of the patient and healthcare professional partnership. It looks at what pain is, what can be done about it and who can help.

Source: britishpainsociety.org
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 17/07/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Stong Opioids for Chronic Pain

There is a wide range of pain relief medicines available without prescription from chemists and supermarkets these days. This leaflets explains how these medicines work and when they could be taken.

Source: painrelieffoundation.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Opioids for persistent pain: information for patients

A statement prepared on behalf of the British Pain Society, the Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Royal College of Anaesthetists,the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Faculty of Addictions of the Royal College of Psychiatrists

Source: britishpainsociety.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 17/07/15 Link Error: Report It

 

"Over the Counter"
Medicines for Pain Relief

This leaflet tells you about what its like to take these strong opioids. It will help you to decide if you want to try them for your chronic pain.

Source: painrelieffoundation.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Managing your pain effectively using “Over the Counter” (OTC) Medicines

Source: britishpainsociety.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 17/07/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Migraine
A fact sheet for patients and carers

This fact sheet provides information on migraines.

Source: brainandspine.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Patient information Sheet for Triptans

This leaflet is intended to provide a brief overview of aspects of this treatment protocol.

Source: exeterheadacheclinic.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain Practice Guide: OTC Sumatriptan

Section on this page

  • Supply criteria
  • Precautions for use
  • Counselling points
  • Contraindications (and other referral criteria)
  • Where to go for further information
Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to member of the RPS

Last Checked: 03/04/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Dizziness and balance problems
A guide for patients and carers

This booklet provides information on dizziness and balance problems. It provides information on

  • the symptoms of dizziness
  • how the balance system works
  • the tests you might need
  • the conditions that can cause dizziness and balance problems, and
  • the treatments that might help.
Source: brainandspine.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Grampian Osteoporosis Service > Patient Information Leaflets

  • Hormone Replacement Therapy and Osteoporosis
  • Supplements of Calcium and Vitamin D
  • Risedronate (Actonel)
  • Raloxifene (Evista)
  • Ibandronate
  • Alendronic Acid or Alendronate (Fosamax)
  • Zoledronic Acid (Aclasta)
  • Strontium Ranelate (Protelos)
  • Parathyroid Hormone (PTH) Treatment for Osteoporosis
  • Calcitriol (Rocaltrol)
Source: nhsgrampian.co.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Information Leaflets
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug treatments for osteoporosis

Short guide to drug treatments for osteoporosis

Source: nos.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 20/07/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Osteoporosis
Clinical guideline for prevention and treatment

Osteoporosis is a progressive disease causing weakening of the bones – if no action is taken it will get worse. The amount of bone decreases and what remains is of poorer quality.

Source: shef.ac.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Drugs for Osteoporosis

This leaflet provides information on drugs for osteoporosis and will answer any questions you have about the treatment.

Source: arthritisresearchuk.org
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Diet Changes When Taking Didronel or Actonel

Source: patienteducation.osumc.edu
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Education Handout
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Dental advice for patients prescribed a bisphosphonate drug

Taking a bisphosphonate drug might affect the way some bones work and so there is a very small risk for developing a condition called bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BONJ).

Source: sdcep.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Patient Advice Leaflet
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Last Checked: 17/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Arthritis Research UK

Arthritis Research UK has a range of patient information booklets and leaflets, to provide an ongoing source of information and support to patients. The resources were written by medical professionals following research into what patients really need.

Abatacept

Adalimumab

Amitriptyline

Azathioprine

Certolizumab pegol

Ciclosporin

Cyclophosphamide

Etanercept

Gold injections

Golimumab

Hydroxychloroquine

Iloprost

Infliximab

Intravenous immunoglobulin

Leflunomide

Local steroid injections

Methotrexate

Mycophenolate

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Rituximab

Steroid tablets

Sulfasalazine

Tocilizumab

Source: arthritisresearchuk.org
Pharmacy Resource: Information Booklets
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis

This factsheet covers the three main biologics currently available in the UK —rituximab (MabThera), abatacept (Orencia) and tocilizumab (RoActemra).

Source: arthritiscare.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 22/03/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Methotrexate treatment

This leaflet has been prepared to support information given to you as part of your discussions with the doctor, nurse or pharmacist before you start treatment with oral methotrexate. This leaflet should be used to help you in these discussions.

Source: npsa.nhs.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Leaflet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

TENS machines - an electronic method of pain relief

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment that administers mild electrical currents to the skin to relieve pain.

Source: arthritiscare.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 22/03/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society Guide: OTC Tamsulosin - 400mcg

Sections on this page

  • Supply criteria
  • Precautions for use
  • Counselling points
  • Contraindications (and other referral criteria)
  • Where to go for further information
Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to member of the RPS

Last Checked: 26/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society Guide: Omeprazole

Section on this page

  • What is omeprazole indicated for?
  • Who should be referred to a GP?
  • What is heartburn and what are its symptoms?
  • How does omeprazole work?
  • What is the dose of omeprazole?
  • Cautions When should omeprazole not be supplied?
  • What are the side effects of omeprazole?
  • Do any drugs interact with omeprazole?
  • Can I supply omeprazole to a third party?
  • Where to go for more information
Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to member of the RPS

Last Checked: 03/04/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal Pharmaceutical Society Guide: Orlistat

This guide will help pharmacists identify the information they need to consider when supplying orlistat 60mg P.

It provides information on how pharmacists can help with weight loss, including advising on diet and exercise, promoting a healthy lifestyle, highlighting the benefits of weight loss and offering diagnostic screening to patients, where appropriate.

Source: rpharms.com
Pharmacy Resource: Guide
Register to Access Content: Yes - content available to member of the RPS

Last Checked: 03/04/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Starting HIV treatment

Doctors are learning more about the best way to treat HIV, but it is still not known for certain when is the best time to start taking HIV treatment.

Source: aidsmap.com
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

HIV treatment

There are different types, or classes, of anti-HIV drugs. Each class works against HIV in a different way. HIV treatment normally includes three drugs from two different classes.

Source: aidsmap.com
Pharmacy Resource: Factsheet
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Introduction to combination therapy

This guide includes information about the most important aspects of HIV treatment.

It is written and reviewed by HIV positive people and health professionals.

If HIV is new to you, then learning about treatment can be daunting. This booklet should help you feel more in control of this aspect of your health care.

Source: i-base.info
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

HIV and your quality of life: a guide to side effects and other complications

HIV treatment is now more effective and simpler to take than ever before. It involves far fewer side effects and usually fewer pills.

This is the sixth edition of this guide and we have focussed on the meds that are now most widely used.

This guide has been written by people who are HIV positive. We have taken many of these treatments and experienced many of the side effects

Source: i-base.info
Pharmacy Resource: Booklet
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

ESPRIT Ciclosporin-Specific Resources

Following the introduction of alternative formulations of ciclosporin into the UK, please find below some materials that will help to communicate the potential complications that could result if a patient were inadvertently switched between ciclosporin brands.

Source: esprit.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 02/06/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Treatment and side effects | Breast Cancer Care

Treatment for breast cancer varies depending on individual circumstances. Our publications will help you understand more about the treatments you may be offered and how they might affect you, as well as suggesting questions you might want to put to your healthcare team.

Source: breastcancercare.org.uk
Pharmacy Resource: Publications
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Last Checked: 03/12/13 Link Error: Report It

 

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